RSD7 Exhibition

Proceedings of RSD7, Relating Systems Thinking and Design 7
Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy  23th-26th October 2018

RSD7 Exhibition “Visualizing Complex Systems”

Campus Lingotto, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy
24th-26th October 2018

Exhibition Curator: Paolo Tamborrini
Adviser and web catalogue: Barbara Stabellini, Chiara Lorenza Remondino

The multi-faceted nature of information brought the society towards a radical change, especially in this era where data production and collection are reaching levels that could not even be imagined until a few years ago. From relations to components, from process to systems, the importance to make these elements more visual became essential to enable new scenarios, innovative systems, and creative mindset in an educative and formative way. This exhibition visualization works aimed at giving prominence to design research and works representing systemic complexity. The ability to collect, cross-check, visualize and study quantitative and qualitative information about phenomena and their patterns is itself at the core of the project, becoming strategic for enabling new systems thinking and their design application. Identifying the relationship between components, thus guaranteeing personal expression, horizontal communication and visual thinking, is the first step to enhance a more conscious and transparent decision-making process with a perspective of sustainability.


Book of Visualization Works

The book of the RSD7 visualization works_ISBN: (PDF)

Exhibition contents

 Abuseif N., Norris N., Wilson-Lee J.
Flourishing Cybernetics. A Biomimetics Post-Secondary Futures Narratives

Aulisio A., Bruno E.V., Tong L.
Rice sector. System and new opportunities

Boehnert J.
The Visual Representation of Complexity. Definitions, examples & learning points

Campbell T., Lutterman A.
Designing Designers. A critical look at design education  

Capobianco  L., McGovern M.
A Systems views of Organ Donation. Exploring complexity within the Canadian organ donation system.

 Cardorani P., Mercenati D., Tetrao M., Molari M., Roscio A., Panichi S., Leal Restrepo M.A.
Waste system in Piedmont Region. Disposed of urban and special waste

de Aguiar Freitas T.L.
Clear. Air Quality Data as a tool for enabling learning and community action

Imbesi S., Giacobone G.A.
Visual explanation of Quality Function Deployment. Strategies to improve the QFD decision-making tool’s usability

Kumar A., Wagle P., Bandakar P.
Design for the Taste-Makers. System oriented innovation for improving life of salt pan labourers

Laroia M., Arun Kumar P., Minz M.,. Khateeb B, Nahar P.
A case study on Access to Electricity. Decentralized People-Centric Energy Model for India

 Laroia M., Gupta  S.
Designing for Comprehensive Healthcare. A ground zero study and system synthesis from India

Nogueira  A.,. Teixeira C, Ashton W.
Anatomy of Systems. A tool for ethnography of infrastructures

Oliveira A., Cortes I., Shand L., Matharu N.
Interstellar. “To Boldly go where no one has gone before”

Passia Y., Roupas P., Skomvoulis D.
HECATE: The Affective City. Mapping the city’s spaces of possibilities

Peter K.
Comparative Stakeholder Relationships Mapping. Using radial convergence to map relationships + prototype change

Stamatopoulou A.
Open Interactive Mapping. Exploring, abstracting, deciding in the relational city

Yang Q.
eHealth: Better Health Care Through Technology. Chronic Disease Management


Flourishing Cybernetics. A Biomimetics Post-Secondary Futures Narratives


Abuseif N., Norris N., Wilson-Lee J.

“Education based solely on past models will fail, whereas education that learns from the past, based on navigating through uncertainty, and built on cooperation, can lead us to create a world we want to live in and pass on to generations to come. The future needs people who are able to synthesize and contextualize information, keep an open mind to continuous change and emergence and look for, and see, a bigger, much bigger picture. Specialist expertise is still essential, but should be linked with other specialist expertise to generate a more comprehensive understanding of the expanding complexity of the emerging world.” (Hodgson, Tony, 2014)

Imagine a world where purpose- driven humans shift our economic and bureaucratic systems using a life-long empathy driven ‘changemaker’ pedagogy. The following systemic map is an optimistic narrative based upon a ‘3 horizon economies’ model where we examine how might post-secondary institutions transform to meet the needs of future social innovators, communities and industries. In the map, as we reach the 3rd horizon of a Flourishing Economy, we visualize through panarchy, Changemakers informing the design of systems inspired by Dr. John Ehrenfeld’s Sustainable Satisfaction Delivery Systems (SSDS) ideology. (Ehrenfeld, 2001). Our narrative concludes with an imagined heuristics model to uncover the way in which we will co-evolve and flourish with autonomous technologies conceptualized as “Flourishing Cybernetics.”


Rice sector. System and new opportunities


Aulisio A., Bruno E.V., Tong L.

This analysis, performed in Piedmont region (Italy), shows in detail the process of rice transformation and the characteristics of every outputs. There are many opportunities for the realization of a project that involves several players in the analyzed area (Vercelli – Italy), because the “waste” produced during the processing of rice reaches high percentages (about 40%) compared to the total raw material entering the supply chain.

The analysis focuses on a company that already implements some good practices, for example a network contract that involves farmers and entrepreneurs, in order to carry on the Vercelli rice tradition, but with a vision to the future. This contract also allows for a well-organized control of the rice supply chain, from cultivation to final products.

Currently, the outputs deriving from this transformation are resold and reused, but not exploited, as they are outputs very rich in nutrients and chemical-physical characteristics exploitable for uses in sectors where they would acquire greater value (bioplastics, green building, food etc…). These are therefore quality outputs and as such they need a process designed in order to continue to accumulate value.

The research underlines all the possible uses and opportunities that the supply chain can offer, giving rise to both economic and environmental benefits and increasing the connections in the territory in what can be defined as a systemic vision.


The Visual Representation of Complexity. Definitions, examples & learning points


Boehnert J.

Sustainability practitioners have long relied on images to display relationships in complex adaptive systems on various scales and across different domains. These images facilitate communication, learning, collaboration and evaluation as they contribute to shared understanding of systemic processes. This research addresses the need for images that are widely understood across different fields and sectors for researchers, policy makers, design practitioners and evaluators with varying degrees of familiarity with the complexity sciences. The research identifies, defines and illustrates 16 key features of complex systems and contributes to an evolving visual language of complexity. Ultimately the work supports learning as a basis for informed decision-making at CECAN (Centre for the Evaluation of Complexity Across the Nexus) and other communities engaged with the analysis of complex problems.

A research process was designed to identify sixteen key characteristics of complexity and to inform the development of new images and descriptions. In order to gather ideas from academics, sustainability practitioners and designers with expertise in the complexity sciences, systems mapping and design, I collected 50 surveys at The Environment, Economy, Democracy: Flourishing Together RSD6 (Relating Systems Thinking and Design) conference in Oslo (October 2017) and ran two participatory workshop in London (November and December 2017). The images, definitions, examples and learning points were developed with this research process. The text below was written with Alex Penn, Pete Barbrook- Johnson, Martha Bicket and Dione Hills. Many thanks to RSD6 organisers and all who contributed images and ideas in the surveys and workshops.


Designing Designers. A critical look at design education


Campbell T., Lutterman A.  

Design has enormous influence on the world at all scales; it mediates our daily experiences and shapes our ways of life. We all “design” to some degree, but professional designers are in a unique position to influence our social practices, our environment, and our experiences of the world. The ways in which professional designers practice is commonly formed through tertiary design education (i.e. at a university or similar).

Living in a time of global ecological and social crises when design could be leveraged to transition to alternative futures, we take a critical look at design education, asking how we might navigate toward sustainable and equitable design practices through a preferred design education landscape.

WHAT IS DESIGN?

Design goes far beyond its popular understanding, ranging from physical products to the natural environment. The deeper layers of design encompass the layers found above them.

WHAT IS THE PROBLEM?

Critiques of the current design education landscape have been mapped using Causal-Layered Analysis (CLA). The four

layers of CLA get deeper to understand a problem from its surface-level manifestations to its deepest, unconscious roots.

WHO IS INVOLVED?

Surface-level problems may be located within design schools, while deeper issues are located within increasingly diffused spaces. We have identified key actors within each problem space and the interventions they have power to act upon.

HOW DO WE TAKE ACTION?

Below are a list of possible points of intervention for transforming design education toward a preferred future from surface to system, drawing directly from the critiques mapped using CLA.

A FINAL WORD…

It is important to discuss and address the surface-level problems within design education, but lasting change will require an exploration of their deep, systemic causes. A preferred future for design education involves working to not only better the education itself, but to build a better world.


A Systems views of Organ Donation. Exploring complexity within the Canadian organ donation system.


Capobianco  L., McGovern M.

The successful transplantation of organs from one individual to another is one of the largest medical advances in modern medicine. The organ transplantation of one deceased individuals organs and tissues can improve the quality of life of up to ten persons lives (Lee, Midodizi, & Gourishankar al., 2010). However, amongst this 96%, only 54% were on the donor registry list (Lee, et al., 2010). This statistic highlights the complexity of the current Canadian organ transplant/registry system, and suggests the opportunity for systems thinking to reimagine the current system structure. Organ donation is further complicated by the provincial and territorial differences in how this process is managed. Each province and territory in Canada has their own system in place for how organ registration and donation will take place. The current model highlight the lack of an overarching national database that collects information on national donor demographics. As well, those who do not support organ donation often cite common misunderstandings surrounding organ procurement such as: lack of respect of the body by medical team, and inability to have desired funeral services, as primary reasons for their choice not to be donors (Morgan, et al., 2008). The unique universal healthcare system in Canada places the nation in a favorable position to implement nationwide change in terms of organ donation (Lee, et al., 2016). The system map created highlights the potential opportunities to improve organ donation and registration by examining global leaders like Spain, the differences between provinces and territories in procurement strategies, policies and educational programs curated to encourage and inform users on donorship, and how this information may be amalgamated to reimagine the future of organ donation and registration within Ontario.


Waste system in Piedmont Region. Disposed of urban and special waste


 Cardorani P., Mercenati D., Tetrao M., Molari M., Roscio A., Panichi S., Leal Restrepo M.A.

Positive data emerge from this holistic survey. As that almost all waste can be exploited and only a small percentage of both RU and RS ends up in landfills. However, the production of waste is growing. This datum can be read in two different ways: if on the one hand it is a symptom of production and consumption, and therefore of economic value creation for the territory, on the other it is in disagreement with the intention of the Piedmont region to decrease the quantity of waste produced.

Data collection is decidedly complex due to the sharp division between reports, so the data we find are related to Urban Waste, or to Special Waste. As for the latter, it is not easy to identify the plants that deal with their recovery and their disposal, but we know the treatment that is carried out for their recovery and their disposal. Moreover, there is the possibility that the production activities, by filling out the MUD, omit quantities of material or do not insert the correct CER code, to reduce the monetary quantity to be paid to the entity that deals with the collection.


Clear. Air Quality Data as a tool for enabling learning and community action


de Aguiar Freitas T.L.

Clear is an exploration of how Service and Systems Oriented Design can be used in the public sector to generate awareness and trigger action regarding environmental topics.

Miljødirektoratet, the environment directorate of Norway, has the mandate to spread knowledge about air quality data with the general population with the aim of reducing harm and changing habits. At the moment, there is a consortium of government bodies that gathers data through several measuring stations scattered around the country. This data is mostly used for scientific purpose.

The problem is that this data has little contextualization to people’s routines, or even worse: it contradicts their whole life choices – moving to the suburbs, having kids, owning a car, etc. This generates a cognitive bias against environmental sound actions and measures (Oslo aims to be car free in it’s city centre, for instance). To make matters worse, air pollution has many causes and sometimes individuals power to act is diminished, asking for stronger policy.

This contradiction asked for a different approach. Instead of trying to change deeply rooted habits, the project targeted children from 8th to 10th grades. The proposal is called ‘Up & Around’: an educational platform composed of a series of activities that are assigned by teachers and performed by students using two dedicated iPad apps. These activities aim to teach children all there is to know about Air Quality and to engage them in action in their communities, so they can spread knowledge to parents and even local authorities.

‘Up & Around’ is also great for teachers: content is based on national curriculum and they can evaluate their student’s work continuously from the app, making it a great tool for teaching.

The ultimate goal of the project is to create the next generation of air quality advocates and introduce the topic of local politics in middle school environment, in order to facilitate for radical changes that will be demanded in the coming years.

In the development of the project, most of the tools of the Systems Oriented Design playbook were used: stablishing a Rich Design Space, utilizing Gigamaps as a means to generate common understanding of a problématique, as well as several methods for systemic impact evaluation of proposed design solutions. User insight and prototyping were an integral part of the whole design processes.


Visual explanation of Quality Function Deployment. Strategies to improve the QFD decision-making tool’s usability


Imbesi S., Giacobone G.A.

The Quality Function Deployment, also known as QFD, was born in Japan around 1965 as a tool to obtain measurable parameters related to design quality, basing on needs and requirements expressed by the users.

The inputs of this tool are the measurable characteristics or attributes of the product or service that is going to be designed, and the needs expressed by the costumer in his own language. These parameters are inserted in a matrix called House of Quality that, using a graphic approach, allows the multidisciplinary team to assign a mark to the degree of correlation. The QFD is usually used in business contexts by multidisciplinary teams that, after being subjected to significant training, for a defined period meet and work together to compile the tool.

The authors have been using the QFD in several design research projects with the aim of bringing innovation using a user centered design approach, including researchers of different fields and professionals working in the markets related to the products or services that were going to be designed. It was noticed that some problems occurred using QFD in contexts where people had not been subjected to adequate training, and where they did not have the opportunity to meet regularly in person, but most of the time they met virtually online.

In this poster the authors suggest some reflections on how graphic solutions could be applied to the QFD, to make this tool’s easier to be used and applied by a multidisciplinary team that never met before and have never used it, with no time to be trained.

The possible graphic strategies will aim to increase the tool’s usability to people with different backgrounds that are using the QFD for the first time, to make it accessible and effective in its results. The support of graphic design is very important to make the process more intuitive and less discouraging, to open the use of the tool to persons that are not specific technicians and to share obtained results to the team in a most intuitive way.


Design for the Taste-Makers. System oriented innovation for improving life of salt pan labourers


Kumar A., Wagle P., Bandakar P.

The Indian social construct is a complex structure comprising of various social, cultural, societal, regional and political elements that are interconnected to each other. The social construct which was primarily occupation based is still effective in certain areas and occupations of India. One of these occupations is of salt pan labourer. Food being one of the most important basic necessities for survival, there needs no second thought to understand the importance of Salt. Just like other food industries, salt manufacturing industry too is moving towards complete automation with minimal human intervention.  But considering the population involved in manual salt manufacturing and the sole dependency of them on this job for livelihood, social innovation was necessary to improve their inhuman living condition. This paper gives and understanding of the grassroot reality in the salt manufacturing areas which was build using systemic design thinking. The approach enabled to look at the problem faced by the Salt Pan labourers from a micro and meta level using design tools like Co-creation workshops, Participatory activity, Shadowing, Day in life, and primary research methods like laddering method etc.

The Insights received after the researches were mapped against their effect at micra and meta level. Systemic design thinking approach enabled in selecting the final ideas that could contribute significantly in the existing system. 5 different levels of solutions were proposed after the exercise to improve the living condition of the salt pan labourer. The final outcomes at micro level were new product interventions,  activities for NGO’s working in the area for development of children and designing Co-creation workshops for NGO’s to bring about an inclusive design solution for solving the future problems. The solutions proposed at macro level were a new self-sustainable or an assistive social business model which would involve all the stakeholders to work together in uplifting the living condition of everyone involved in the business of manual salt manufacturing. A policy level intervention was also part of the final outcome, which was proposed understanding the magnitude of effect a small policy could make in the system.


A case study on Access to Electricity. Decentralized People-Centric Energy Model for India


Laroia M., Arun Kumar P., Minz M.,. Khateeb B, Nahar P.

Most of the developing world still lives in darkness. In India alone, 400 million people have irregular or no access to electricity. The system is ever evolving and dependent on numerous interplaying factors varying from macro ones like government policies to micro ones like electricity theft and over-consumption due to lifestyle practices.

The India-specific research incorporated a megatrend study, outlining the contributing factors, product-service life-cycles, analysing electricity usage and interacting with stakeholders. Extensive mapping revealed underlying patterns like the complex network of flows, threats, opportunities, feedback loops and latent links that add to the delicacy of the system. ‘Personas’ served as instrumental nodes in understanding user-behaviour, user-needs and the demand for context-specific solutions that must work coherently within the system.

The developed Giga-map was used to analyse a case of a Decentralised Electricity System, with a vision for 2040. Respecting the variability, multiple solutions were designed for energy equity. The Giga-map served as a tool to provide a safe playing area to test new ideas and debate opportunities, creating grounds for deliberation. The reader can choose an Avatar, trace the lifecycle of electricity and fit ones-self into different contexts to foresee solutions and plan for effective execution. The proposed people-centric system could serve as a resource for communities to plan better policies with a holistic understanding of the system, empowering people and making electricity accessible.


Designing for Comprehensive Healthcare. A ground zero study and system synthesis from India


Laroia M., Gupta  S.

The Indian healthcare system is a convoluted web of interplaying elements, a rare occurrence, where the public and private sector coexist, interact and function simultaneously to deliver healthcare services. Considering, the public and private health systems as sub-systems of the whole, it was observed that solutions don’t easily penetrate into or traverse through these sectors. Moreover, the causality of the problems in the system remains largely misunderstood, leading to piled up unmet needs. These are wicked problems as they bleed into one another making designing for health in India, challenging.

The adoption of System Thinking methodologies like cluster mapping, user-experience graphs and feedback loops, emerged as effective tools for information handling and synthesis. The Giga map, drawn thereafter, compares the state proposed structure of the system with its abysmal ground realities along with outlining the patients’ experiences while navigating this system.

The public and private system were observed as a whole and their comparative analysis was quintessential in deciphering unforeseen relationships, making the system study unique to our context. Their disparateness led to the emergence of a unique and inspiring interplay for discovering unmet needs. It is in this context that the study conducted holds relevance and lays the ground for dialogue and discovering the ‘sweet spot of intervention.’


Anatomy of Systems. A tool for ethnography of infrastructures


Nogueira  A.,. Teixeira C, Ashton W.

BACKGROUND

Designers are known for their abilities to create interventions (products, services infrastructures and systems) with product- technology features capable of promoting new experiences among actors. While these interventions are often oriented towards impacting social systems, they embed new affordances into the socio- ecological context, and generate new interactions not only among humans, but also between humans and non-humans’ actors. As the field increasingly engages in complex socio-ecological challenges, new methodologies are required to incorporate considerations of the dynamic, non- linear interactions among actors shaping these challenges. We explored novel approaches to ethnography and prototyping of infrastructures in order to (1) uncover the logics shaping these interactions, and (2) iterate interventions to increase the fitness in socio-ecological systems. We assumed design practices as iterative processes in which participants continuously gathered information about context through prototyping.

THE TOOL

This tool supports actors in understanding the interconnectivity between them. It situates the goals of the system in the center, representing the societal level, and the features of the system in the outlier circle, representing the product- technology level. Features are followed by affordances, representing product- service systems, and impacts within socio-technical systems. This correlation is helpful for designers to understand not only multi-level integration but also how features, the interactions among actors

afforded by them, the impacts these interactions generate, and the overall alignment between the features and the intended goals can be integrated into new systems interventions. Each zone (or level of the system) should be read separately given its own dimensions. While there is no single path for utilizing this tool, here is one suggestion, following the logic of: Goals <-> Impacts <-> Affordances <-> Features

STEP 1: List the overall goals of the system, and situate them in the center of the diagram.

STEP 2: Identify few indicators of impacts supporting the achievement of the goal. These should be represented as variables impacting the dynamics of the system. Situate them in the next zone, and connect these indicators with the goals.

STEP 3: Identify features of the system supporting impacts, and position them in the outside circle. These should be actors, products, and services that interact in the system of interest.

STEP 4: Connect the impacts with the features through the actionable properties each one of the features embeds into the system.

You might use color coding for separating the different levels and elements.

Ultimately, this activity should surface multi-level interactions, and how different types of resources are flowing between the levels of the system. Validate your representation with others.

CONTEXT OF APPLICATION

We applied some tools of this new methodology in ‘The Future of Farmers Market’ project, a partnership between IIT-Institute of Design, a graduate design school in Chicago, and the Plant Chicago, a non-profit organization located on the south side of Chicago with a mission to cultivate local circular economies through education, research, and incubation. Plant Chicago recently began working to develop collective activities with co-located businesses at The Plant, an industrial facility on the south side of Chicago that serves as a community building space for local food and beverage businesses. The project focused on multi-systems integration as a strategy for developing circular economies, and considered farmers’ markets as critical paths for advancing transitions in the local context. By applying new tools, participants uncovered four main challenges among farmers’ markets: data application, access to best practices, materials & nutrient management, and rules & regulations. Once these patterns were situated within the system’s anatomy, participants were able agree on four actionable properties that market managers should intervene to advance local circular economy practices in Chicago: collaboration, education, facilitation, coordination.


Interstellar. “To Boldly go where no one has gone before”


Oliveira A., Cortes I., Shand L., Matharu N.

A GAME OF COOPETITION

The intrinsic human need to explore, discover, and conquer new frontiers saturates every domain, from sports to science. By far the most daunting of these domains, whether material, physiological, or intellectual, is interstellar space. Although still at least 100 years away from viable commercial space travel to Mars, the entities with the means to drive this pursuit remain vigilant despite popular wisdom. It is a pursuit that requires a non-zero-sum game, a Systems Thinking perspective of global cooperation and mutual gain. Technology, policy, and social advancements born out of space travel may provide the answers to some of Earth’s most pressing problems. The challenge has been to inspire the vast majority of people to look upwards again after decades of fixation on the current world condition. Media and entertainment play significant roles in influencing attitudes and world views, and games in particular can offer ways to explore complex multidimensional ideas in simple and fun ways. By combining gaming and systems concepts, Interstellar, explores the social and ethical plateaus that challenge our evolution toward a unified space-going species through a compelling multiplayer board game. By balancing the causal, and contradictory, relationships between military, civilian, commercial and scientific interests, the game lets players explore the dynamics between cooperation vs competition, and their effects on advancing civilization into Space.


HECATE: The Affective City. Mapping the city’s spaces of possibilities


Passia Y., Roupas P., Skomvoulis D.

INTRO: SPACE OF POSSIBILITIES

The project theorizes the city as a multiplicity, a structure of spaces of possibilities while at the same time trying to establish a liaison between the city’s properties, tendencies and capacities. While space is generally perceived – within complexity theory and dynamic systems theory – as a changing field of dense interactions that occur in a range of spatial and temporal scales, we are unable to perceive it or describe it in these terms. In this framework, Hecate is the city’s apparatus; an urban “mining” system able to decipher, map, connect, or navigate itself through the superimposed layers of information within an urban territory. It is an interactive city scape, a complementary organizational system to the actual city. It is visualized as a network of richly interconnected nodes of varying intensities, each representing information flows between the system and the city.

MAPPING: AN INFORMATIVE MINING SYSTEM

In order to push the boundaries further we have to surpass the appearance of the existing form of the city as a constructed landscape of forms, built upon percepts that are fundamentally immanent and insurmountable. The complexity of information act as an obstacle to the acquisition of personal cognition and knowledge. By mapping a landscape of points of interaction we have developed a mining system which extracts information from contemporary urban landscapes without theorizing a single viewpoint as a vantage point. Any geolocated point within the urban sphere becomes vantage point independently from our a priori imposed symbolic values. Using algorithmic procedures in order to construct a simplified ontogenic model we seek to represent the correlations through an apparatus which has the capacity to translate any information in a qualitative tension. That is the main reason why any information Hecate depicts is organized based on the number of points per surface and the proximity of these points. That means that each semantic layer of the city is translated in geo referenced intensities.

The main aim of this procedure is to complement in a quasi-virtual apparatus the site specific symbolic content through the qualitative compression of information. The concept of abstraction as a site specific operation is crucial because of its immanent capacity of compressing different informational layers in a single entity that preserves the invariant traits while it preserves its capacity to diversify the informational layers into local instantiations. These characteristics made the procedure a method for the organization of information, the simplification of the representation, the diversification of thought processes and the increasing possibilities of the formation of new territories of space interaction.

MATERIALITY: MANIFESTATION OF VIRTUALITY

Performing a recurring two-fold process – collect information and distribute it in the city – it creates a virtual network of nodes that interact and finally form a “living” organism attached to the public areas of urban territory. This network reinstates the areas of intensities within the urban context through the local instantiations of the structure which has previously interacted with the global information system of the city in order to form itself. Each node interacts with the user, makes local decisions and forms an autonomous architectural structure in order to reveal the space of intensities according to the user. This “informative spatial object” consisting of a network of nodes interconnected via an exoskeleton in the exact coordinates that will reveal the tendencies inherent in the urban fabric, has its own spatial formation while the ability to interconnect with other nodes, reveals its immanent capacity for mutation.


Comparative Stakeholder Relationships Mapping. Using radial convergence to map relationships + prototype change


Peter K.

This visualization came out of a larger research study that looked at alternative narratives on the future of economic growth. Motivated to understand why the current economic system appears to be failing us, and what a human-centered approach might bring to the challenge, the study investigated both current and alternative narratives on economic growth and how a participatory approach to reframing might enable transition to a more desirable alternative. Within the context of the larger study, role play was used to enlist diverse inputs of both expert and non-expert stakeholders.

ACTIVITY: Using an alternative narrative developed in the first phase of the study, twelve stakeholders were engaged in the second phase for a simulated discussion addressing the question of “How might we get to a more inclusive economy?”. The activity was guided by prompts derived from Roman Krznaric’s “Rough guide to how change happens” (2007) covering the desired change, who is involved, what strategies might be taken, what contexts they might play out within and pathways or processes that might be needed to bring about the change.

OUTCOME: A key outcome was that narratives in combination with role play can be used as both representatives of the change desired as well as probes for change, and that through simulated enactment of an alternative narrative stakeholders in the system might themselves begin to enact the change in the world. Further, strategies generated in the role play were intended to encourage policy influencers and policy makers to adopt and evolve a richer and more participatory set of policy research and development tools. Among the strategies was the recommendation to engender a prototyping mindset across government, including the introduction and use of narrative probes.

ANALYSIS: Radial convergence maps were created to first anticipate the nature of relationships within the role play—notably the alliances and tensions that might form—then to analyze and understand stakeholder interactions within each of the two groups and comparatively across the groups.

From the visual analysis emerged a list of potential stakeholders to involve in future engagements (simulated or actual), an awareness of advantaged and disadvantaged stakeholders, and potential and non-obvious partnerships that could be fostered within the larger system.

STAKEHOLDERS TO INVOLVE IN FUTURE ENGAGEMENTS (SIMULATED AND ACTUAL), SPECIFICALLY: Youth, seniors, enterprise board members, global advisors, libertarians and Indigenous Peoples.

ADVANTAGED AND DISADVANTAGED STAKEHOLDERS, NOTABLY: Government, startups and effective storytellers are seen as advantaged, and immigrants and youth are among those considered disadvantaged.

POTENTIAL AND NON-OBVIOUS PARTNERSHIPS, FOR EXAMPLE: Media and wellbeing advocates, enterprise and startups, immigrants and startups.


Open Interactive Mapping. Exploring, abstracting, deciding in the relational city


Stamatopoulou A.

Spatio-temporal territories are constantly changing complex systems composed of heterogeneous content: material and immaterial elements, as these interactions are being generated, combined and experienced by diverse subjects in a specific context. Open Interactive Mapping is the visualisation of an under-construction methodology of mapping-and-designing the city, through this point of view. The methodology approaches the city as constituted by signifying objects-subjects’ interactions, which can reveal its component relations among heterogeneous para- meters. In dialogue with questions on how city’s multiplicity can be mapped and how such a mapping might contribute to designing-intervening processes, intention of the methodology is to function as a tool capable of revealing and at the same time abstracting city’s complexity, contributing to decision-making and management processes in a territory. The methodology the methodology is composed of three levels of actions (fig.1 in blue colour): the gathering of data (diverse mappings); the search of translation parameters among the mappings; applications and experiments that test the methodology in specific case-studies. The organisation and the capacities of data management are being performed through the Open Interactive Map (OIM) that is being presented in this poster. The general aim of the OIM is to be capable of organising and managing city’s complexity as this emerges from multiple mappings and their relations. The OIM is a system of a data base of multiple mappings in their original form, a table and a map (fig.1 in green colour). The horizontal axis of the table integrates references to all the different mappings and the vertical the properties/ (translation) parameters list as organised in categories. On the map the different references to physical locations are noted. The data-base, the table and the map are interconnected through many options of selections. For instance, selections on the table can activate networks of locations on the map, enabling multiple decompositions and recompositions of the city beyond the physical ones. Selections on the map can indicate properties attributed to locations. Combinations – sequences of selections in a logic of back-and-forth actions, based on specific scenarios and intentions can guide and support a decision-making process while feeding the perspective of design logics that take nothing fore-granted.


eHealth: Better Health Care Through Technology. Chronic Disease Management

Yang Q.

Our journey into the Canadian health care system may be a top-down approach, starting with macro policies and regulations. However, for most of us, we relate our personal experiences of our interactions with the health care system to our impressions of the overall system. Starting from this personal perspective, we begin our journey with James, a retired 65-year old man with symptoms suggestive of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). James needs to consult with his family doctor to get a diagnosis and treatment for his health problems. James has limited mobility and depends on his daughter, Hedy, to help him get to medical appointments. Starting from this personal situation, I will proceed to describe a shift from a problem-solving focus to a paradigm shift of constructivism where the definition of the problem is less clear and where complexity precludes a linear search for solutions and where there is no optimal solution. I will use a systems oriented design approach to explore the complexity of the issues involved in this seemingly straightforward matter. I will be using a gigamap to visually display the complexity. “Gigamapping is super extensive mapping across multiple layers and scales with the goal of investigating relations between seemingly separate categories, hence providing boundary critiques on the conception and framing of systems (Sevaldson, 2012).” Canadian federalism pose unique challenge and opportunities in health care delivery that are more apparent what visually displayed.